Anchovy fillets in sunflower and olive oil

Small but strong in taste - these are anchovies. They look a bit like herrings and come from a large family of more than 140 subspecies found all over the world. Anchovies eat plankton and young fish and, like the sardine, are a fatty fish. Anchovies are the perfect tastemakers for salad dressing or pasta sauces.

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Origin

Our Cantabrian anchovy comes from Getaria, right at the Cantabrian Sea. The 12,000 inhabitants live off the fishing industry and tourism, quite understandably because the ancient city center is as pretty as a picture.

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Seafood with a story

Anchovy fisherman Nemesio makes it his own personal challenge to fish as sustainably as possible. “We live in a great country, we have gorgeous beaches, a wild ocean and delicious fish. At the same time, that’s all we have, so if we want to pass this on to the next generations, we have to keep working on the future.”

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Fishing method

The fishermen lure the sardines from so-called purse-seine-boats with a lamp to the water surface and then put a net around the school. When they pull the net down, it forms a basket around the school.

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Because sardines swim in compact schools, this catching method is very selective - and doesn’t harm the environment. Young fish can easily escape between the holes in the nets and the fishermen don’t fish during mating season. This guarantees a stable population.

Straight from the ocean

At Sea Tales we want you to know what the origin is of your fish and what has happened between the catch and your frying pan. We believe that a fully transparent chain makes it easier to choose for fair products - and to enjoy your fish totally guilt-free.

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